Aviation Marketing

Aviation Marketing Consulting Blog Named to Feedspot Top 50 Aviation Blogs

The Aviation Marketing Consulting’s Blog has been chosen as one of the Top 50 Aviation Blogs by Feedspot.

Blogs are ranked based on the following criteria:

  • Google reputation and Google search ranking
  • Influence and popularity on Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites
  • Quality and consistency of posts
  • Feedspot’s editorial team and expert review

Feedspot lets you read all your favorite blogs in one place. Check out the complete list here:  http://blog.feedspot.com/aviation_blogs/

Programmatic Advertising. The 21st Century Marketing Trend, You Never Heard Of

Back in the day, marketers would spend weeks, sometimes months, deciding where to place their ad messages. They had armies of media researchers on the case, giving them statistical data about audiences for specific TV shows or magazines.  When decisions were finally made and it came time to buy, the marketer simply called upon a human in their ad agency’s media department to place an order for a 30 second spot on the evening news or a two-page spread in a news weekly.

Well folks, those days are as gone as dodo birds and piston-engine airliners. Today, many online display and banner ad placements are bid on and purchased in nanoseconds by robots (or to be more quaint about it, by computers) talking to each other. It’s called Programmatic Advertising. And its new to aviation marketing.

The good news? The robots don’t do lunch and the advertisers don’t have to pay for it. The bad news? It’s the fastest growth engine in the marketing game and many advertisers and their marketing agencies know as much about how it works as they do about ADS-B.

How prevalent is programmatic ad buying? According to Ad Week, “In 2015, $14.88 billion worth of U.S. ads, fully 55 percent of digital display ads, were purchased programmatically. In total, 52 percent of all non-search digital ad transactions were programmatic.”

What exactly is programmatic advertising and why should you care?

In case you’ve not been paying attention for the past twenty years, the marketing game has gone from macro to micro-targeting. Today’s target audience comes down to one individual checking out your website, or your competitor’s home page. In the blink of an eye, a program can access that web visitor and break him or her down to age, gender, buying habits, and interest level in your product − even whether the viewer’s desire to purchase is imminent.

If you’re looking for the secret ingredient in this process, it’s called Artificial Intelligence. By nature, it’s the stuff robots are made of. Artificial Intelligence spreads its wide net across the internet, eventually narrowing down users who fit the demographic and psychographic of your target. It’s not looking for lots of people. It’s looking for the right ones.

The program then passes the information on to the marketer’s computers or robots and asks if the marketer wants to bid on placing their display ad in front of the prospect. The marketer’s robot considers what the buying service robot has to provide about the prospect, and decides in a split second to bid or pass on the opportunity. If it’s a bid (and there should be no surprise here), the higher the bid, the better the chance of securing the space. This is called “Real-time bidding” and the whole process happens in less than the time it takes to form a thought.

Forbes has estimated RTB (Real-time bidding) “will accelerate at a rate of 59% compound annual rate through 2016, making it the fastest growing segment in digital advertising.”

Wait a second! People don’t buy from ads at first sight!

It’s true!  Just because you’re interested in a product, that doesn’t mean you’re going to buy it immediately. Still, if you’re part of a certain market segment, your interest level may be heightened and your buying predisposition is certainly greater. Most pilots would love to own a jet, but few can afford one, and those that can are usually not impulse buyers.

Why jump at a prospect if they’re not going to buy right now?

To answer this, let’s go back to Marketing 101 and talk about customer needs. We all need things for a multitude of personal reasons. When you’re in the buying mode, the need becomes more urgent. For example, if you’re looking for a new aviation headset, you’re probably a pilot, so you’re already set apart from the general population. If you’ve checked out a few manufacturers’ websites, compared prices on Sporty’s, Pilot Shop, Aircraft Spruce or even Amazon or EBay − the robots are watching your every move! They’re even watching the number of times you’ve checked these sites in the past. In other words, they’re sizing you up as a potential buyer. The more the algorithm sizes the customer up, the richer the information it passes on. Capturing that user at the moment he or she is on a particular site goes to the highest bidder.

Naturally, for high-ticket items like an aircraft purchase, your ad needs multiple exposures to make a sale. The good news for the advertiser (or the advertiser’s robot, to be precise) is that it is bidding on a prospect that has demonstrated a high interest in the advertiser’s product and is most likely ready to make a purchase.

Think about it. How many times have you opened your browser and found a display ad for a product you’ve been researching on the web? Too often, right? Well, you probably fit the profile a marketer is looking for and one which its marketing robots are on the lookout for.

Are there limitations to programmatic advertising?

While the robots are very good at keeping track of people surfing on their desktops, they have a bit of a problem capturing your every move when you’re using your cell phone. This is because cell phone cookies (little files about your usage left in your computer) are not as uniform or as robust as they are on larger computers. This limitation won’t be around long given the speed at which technology adjusts to marketplace roadblocks.

Brave New Marketing Worlds.

Programmatic Advertising is here to stay. Big marketers were early adaptors, but it seems the word is spreading to all marketers. The reasoning is simple. If the target prospect is a fertile find, the chances of turning a marketing message into a sale are greater. If more marketing messages create sales, your return on investment goes way up. That’s a win-win for everyone except those humans who used to be media buyers. Brave new world? Certainly, but we humans have a tendency to adapt.

UberChopper and the coming age of helicopter ride sharing.

We live in a gee-whiz time when catching a ride is as easy as opening a cell phone app. Uber may not be as futuristic as “Beam me up, Scotty,” but it certainly has caused turbulence with the taxi industry. Now, Uber wants to transform how we get around in the air. Enter UberChopper, an exciting new way to request a helicopter taxi that is creating great interest and great concern at the same time.

Compared to air travel by jet, riding in a helicopter to get from point A to point B is not something the average American is used to doing. Truthfully, it probably won’t be commonplace for some time to come because vertical flight is far more expensive per hour than fixed-winged flight. Still, in certain American cities like Los Angeles and New York your chances of hopping a chopper to get to a weekend hideaway or to beat the traffic to the airport are much higher than elsewhere.

Uber has been experimenting with providing shared helicopter rides for a few years now. In 2013, it offered exclusive helicopter rides to New Yorkers wishing to get to their Hampton, Long Island retreats without having to battle the mind-numbing traffic on the Long Island Expressway. Uber again offered helicopter service during the United States Formula 1 Grand Prix in Austin, Texas. They also partnered with helicopter flying services to ferry people at the Cannes Film Festival, the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival, and most recently at the Sundance Film Festival. Uber’s efforts have been met with both resistance, as well as with success.

Not the first, but potentially the biggest.

The idea of using a helicopter as a taxi is not a new one. In the early 1950s, New York Airways was created to ferry people to various New York Airports. It operated through the late 70s, picking up passengers from the top of what was then called the Pan Am Building and flying them to various New York airports. The service was suspended in New York after a serious fatal accident in 1979.

More recently, the helicopter has become a jet setter’s taxi. In Los Angeles, many studio executives use helicopters to transport themselves from Malibu to studios in L.A. In Texas the helicopter is the Oil Executive’s mode of transportation for getting to drilling platforms in the Gulf of Mexico.

New York of late has given rise to a new helicopter phenomenon: the helicopter ride share. In the past two years, three companies have come into existence specializing in helicoptering groups of people from downtown New York to the Hamptons or to New York Area airports. They are Blade, Gotham Air and Uber. All of these services are set up for ride-shares for four to six passengers. Just like a shared taxi ride in Manhattan, the cost of the ride is divided by the passengers, thus bringing a flight that could cost upwards of $2000 down to mere hundreds per passenger.

Please Note: Unlike on-demand flights for fixed wing aircraft owners, the FAA has not ordered on-demand helicopter companies to cease and desist. The reason is that booking agents, like Uber, connect customers with helicopter charter companies that employ commercial-rated pilots. The problem with the fixed wing services was that they were connecting passengers with non-commercial-rated private pilots, which the FAA deems a safety problem.

Why Uber Could Become The Biggest Player.

UberChopper may never become as ubiquitous as street Uber, but for those living in the fast lane it might become as convenient.

Uber not only has a national presence but is gaining international recognition as well. Recently it partnered with aviation giant Airbus, to further expand on-demand helicopter services. That partner also known as the European Aerospace Consortium happens to make, among other things, helicopters.

The partnership between software app and aviation hardware was recently tested at the Sundance Film Festival. Airbus provided its H125 and H139 helicopters and Uber provided the helicopter pilots together with an affluent consumer base wishing to cut time and complication out of travelling to and from the Sundance festival.

Why would Airbus consider such an arrangement? Current economics. With oil prices plunging, oil and gas companies, which have been the mainstay helicopter client, have cut back on new helicopter orders. Hence, Airbus is looking to grow their market by looking for new ways their helicopters are used, and by whom.

How did the Airbus/Uber partnership fair at Sundance?

For the cost of $200 per person during the day, and $300 a person at night, a Sundance attendee could take a fifteen minute flight to the Festival beating the crowds and the traffic. For many it was worth the money to share a helicopter ride with several other Festival goers.

There was, however, a snag. People in the quiet countryside around the Festival began to complain about the noise. The Sheriff of Summit County ordered a halt to the flights claiming that the landing zone was illegal and that both Uber (and competing helicopter service Blade) needed permits.

A District Judge ruled those who sued the helicopter services did not have enough evidence that county zoning rules were being violated, or that permits were required. The solution was an alternate landing site agreeable to both UberChopper and local residents, and as they say, the show went on.

One last note about the viability of on-demand helicopter services.

Despite the compromises that were struck at Sundance, helicopter on-demand chopper services still face some challenges from localities, like Summit County. You may recall last year the townspeople of East Hampton and South Hampton on Long Island, sought to put a curfew on helicopter landings due to noise pollution issues. Residents along the West Side of Manhattan have been seeking to curb helicopter flights up and down the Hudson corridor for years now, claiming that noise is so constant, there is little peace 24/7.

Festivals like Sundance encourage on-demand helicopter service for a limited time. Operations like Blade and Gotham Air and now Uber in Manhattan represent a more permanent service. The battle lines between folks on the ground and folks who want ride share in the air, have not and will not, go away. Not soon at any rate. As long as Uber has an app and someone has an available helicopter /pilot, it looks like on-demand chopper service is here to stay.

Where are the Best Marketing Opportunities for 2016?

Aviation Marketing Trends

Here is our road map to the top aviation marketing trends for 2016

The start of a new year is a smart time to re-evaluate your aviation marketing strategy, looking back on what proved successful, but also forward to what new trends look promising. Some marketing trends play themselves out in a matter of months, while others stick around for years. Either way, you cannot afford to stick your head in the sand, like the proverbial ostrich, while your competition takes off and soars ahead. Trends are changing so quickly in the digital landscape that those who do not participate could find their wings clipped.

Many of the trends we highlighted within the last year are still going strong: mobile marketingsocial mediaintegrated marketing – so this year’s may look familiar. Visual marketing continues to be important as businesses fight for their share of fragmented attention spans. Mobile isn’t going anywhere (with a few new developments we’ll discuss), and businesses will keep producing useful content to provide more value to their customers.

Now let’s look at what’s new for 2016.

  1. Optimize for mobile

In case you haven’t noticed, many pilots have gone mobile. They take along iPads and iPhones into the cockpit, and if they’re not surfing on them for the latest flight conditions, they’re certainly utilizing flight apps like ForeFlight. It should be no surprise then that mobile has now officially become the dominant channel through which people access the internet. Mobile digital media time (51%) has now overtaken desktop at 42% according to eMarketer. That means aviation marketers that are not optimized for mobile viewing will be at a distinct disadvantage. This also will have an impact on . . .

  1. Location-Based Marketing Continues to Innovate

Mobile devices are the gateway to instant and effective marketing messages. Every consumer with a mobile device in hand is a target for messaging that is triggered by beacon technology. Retail and other “brick-and-mortar” businesses that have these beacons in place can detect when a customer is in close proximity and can then push timely, targeted messages to that customer. It’s a little “Big Brother is watching” and customers may be initially turned off by this privacy issue. However, as this mode of marketing becomes more prevalent and accepted by consumers, it offers businesses with physical locations some tremendous marketing advantages – like reminding a first officer in the pilot’s lounge that the FBO’s Pilot Shop is running a special promotion on headsets! 

  1. Context Behind the Content

Google is getting finicky about recognizing good content. It is not just about the keywords anymore – the context behind the words and the value to the consumer is more important. Well written web content will become a major driver in 2016. If you keep bringing pilots back to your site for information that matters to them, they’ll keep coming back to you as a source they can trust. Trust is priceless in the aviation marketing business because it’s an emotional trigger that reassures pilots and other aviation industry consumers that they’re dealing with people who know their business and understand their needs.

  1. Social Media Drives Search

Social media channels are now being used to drive search to a large degree. Google has started indexing social media content so it is more important than ever to make sure your business maintains an active profile across all channels. Today’s aviation professional also uses social media to conduct research within the platforms themselves, sometimes even bypassing Google altogether.

  1. Mobile Apps Keep Evolving

Mobile apps are still another mobile-friendly addition to increase your online presence. You can get a DUAT app for you phone and you can buy lots of other mobile apps from Sporty’s online. Google already includes content from apps in its search results and today’s aviation industry workers continue to download and access apps on a daily basis. More and more aviation businesses are seeing the value of creating customized apps for their client base, to generate customer loyalty and making transactions easier. Mobile app store revenues worldwide are projected to grow to $76.5 billion in 2017 according to Statista. This data points to a move from the mobile web to mobile apps, especially for ecommerce.

  1. Pop Ups Drive Conversion

New data shows that pop ups are an effective tool for driving email sign-ups with an enticing call to action. When used in the wrong context or for a hard sell, they can be annoying and intrusive. But when properly executed, pop-ups can work very well and furthermore can’t hurt. The more opportunities for email capture on your site, the better. We suggest you do your own testing and find out how it works for you.

  1. User-Generated Content (UGC) Will Surpass Branded Content

Using content created by customers of your brand adds a more native feel to your marketing. Many consumers, especially new Millennial pilots, look for user-generated content to help them make purchasing decisions. According to bazaarvoice, over half (51%) of Americans trust UGC more than other information on a company website (16%) or news articles about the company (14%) when looking for brand information. Make sure to put consumer opinions and images front and center on your website and social media channels.

Conclusion

In general, advancements in technology will bring aviation marketers closer than ever to their aviation consumer in 2016. The user experience will become ever more important in how aviators and all aviation professionals receive messaging and interact with brands. The technologies that make this possible will take center stage, helping those in the aviation marketplace tell more cohesive brand stories (and at the same time more personalized), everywhere their customers are. And thanks to today’s skeptical, connected consumer, those stories will have to be rooted in transparency and authenticity – your aviation customers will see through anything else as though it was as transparent as air.

Unresponsive Websites Prevent Marketers From Reaching Vy.

Google Wants Responsive Web Design

Google is forcing all digital advertisers to become multimedia conscious

Aviation companies are subject to lots of external forces — weather, traffic, regulations, fuel price increases, pilot shortages, labor disputes etc. Now, they have another issue to deal with – Google. The problem is Google has the power to hurt your aviation business by stifling your online visibility to your target audience. Less visibility means less awareness and less awareness – well, you get the idea.

What’s Google doing that is a concern for aviation companies?

Google announced that they were giving all their advertising clients until April 21st of this year to make their websites and other digital marketing platforms “responsive.”

What are responsive websites? They’re websites designed to look great no matter what device you view them on, from older CRT monitors to the new widescreen LEDs, including iPads, iPhones and Android tablets and smart phones. Websites and other marketing messages based on unresponsive designs only look good on larger desktop screens and when they are viewed on cell-phone-sized screens they either look terrible or they shrink so much they become illegible.

What happens if you’re “unresponsive” to Google’s new regulations?

Google will begin to penalize their clients whose websites are unresponsive by downgrading their SEO rankings on mobile devices. SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization, which is a process used to improve how high a website appears in the search results found in Google (as well as Bing and Yahoo). That means a search term that used to put your website at the top of Google’s search rankings may now sink you to a lower altitude on the rankings if your website has an “unresponsive” design.

Remember, Google is first and foremost a search engine.  It is designed to search the web for requested search topics and bring a list of appropriate websites back to you. In the process, advertisers related to your search topic will appear at the top and right hand column of your search results. They appear in a pecking order relative to how much they bid for top position AND by the appropriateness of the content they provide (including if the website is responsive or not).

Naturally, it’s up to the advertiser to make sure his or her messaging is clear and intriguing, but if Google penalizes you for not having the proper responsive programming, your company is going to get a lower position even if you bid higher than a competitor.

That’s because now only the responsive websites will go to the top of the list when a search is done on a mobile device. Furthermore, better designed websites will get preference over poorer designed ones, too, because the better designs will be easier to read, easier to navigate and will create more clicks and dollars for Google.

Not Just For Google AdWords Customers

Google’s responsive website mandate is not limited to those who use Google AdWords. Non-responsive websites will also be affected in Google’s organic (non-paid) results on mobile devices. And while Google has stated that this latest change will limited to mobile devices, don’t be surprised if lacking a responsive website doesn’t negatively impact your SEO ranking on desktop computers in the near future.

Why aviation companies should be concerned:

In case you haven’t noticed, the web is in a constant state of flux and change. What was all the rage yesterday is old news today. The introduction of smart phones back in 2007 caused a paradigm shift in digital marketing.  Seven years into this change the effects are beginning to become seismic.  Here are some of the facts you should know:

  • The number of smart phone users will surpass 2 billion by the end of 2015 and by 2018 half the world’s cell phones will be “smart;” this year alone mobile traffic is up 3.5%
  • Smart phone users are impatient: 74% of them will only wait 5 seconds for a website to load
  • 72% of data users use smart phones when traveling; 64% when dining; 63% in online stores
  • 57% of users do not recommend non-mobile-friendly websites to other users.

All of this is bad news if your website is unresponsive.  The good news is that there are pre-programmed design templates as well as plenty of designers who can update your website and make it responsive to the navigational features and format requirements of mobile devices.

Your Problem is really Google’s Problem. Their solution? You fix it!

For those who wonder how Google makes its money, the answer is simple: advertising. In the world of digital advertising, dollars are generated by the number of clicks an ad message generates. Basically when you advertise on Google and a member of your target audience clicks on the ad’s interactive button, it takes you to an online store where you can purchase the product or service advertised.

The problem for Google is the amount of money advertisers have been willing to pay per click has been declining for the past several years. Part of the reason for the decline in pricing is because of mobile ads.

As more consumers turn to mobile devices for their information, Google clients who don’t adhere to mobile formats do not come across clearly or attractively. Worse yet, because they find the advertising and product information inferior they turn to methods other than Google to find information and buy online.

Google is partially responsible for this situation because in their eagerness to maintain clients, they originally told clients not to worry about creating separate campaigns for mobile. Google users continued to use the same online stores they always had. These stores, however, were not very easy to use on mobile devices. This resulted in fewer transactions and ultimately less revenue for Google.

Google’s current solution to the problem is to make their all clients change their websites to responsive designs. That puts the onus and the cost on the advertisers, not Google.

Why should you have to play it Google’s way?

Regardless of whether there are other ways to buy online, Google still commands the lion share of online searches and is the search portal where most consumers begin information mining. If you’re an advertiser you still want Google to find you that key prospect.

Furthermore, from a logic point of view, why would you not want your website to be the best it can be? Without being ready for mobile, companies risk not reaching their best potential audience.

With mobile trending upward and desktop downward, it is simply a matter of math.

Why Aviation Companies should accommodate Google’s demands now.

Many aviation companies are service companies such as charter airlines, airframe and engine rebuilders, and flight schools. These kinds of businesses rely on customers who are looking for information on the web. The power of Google taps interested customers every second of every day.

Because aviation is a niche business, search engine advertising serves it very well.

Keeping in step with the mobile trends should be a no brainer for aviation much the same way glass cockpits and GPS systems make flying easier and more reliable.

Get some professional help before it is too late.

Regardless of whether Google is making you modernize your digital marketing or not, it’s simply the smart thing to do. There’s lots of help out there to help you make the transition, including professional marketing communications companies like Advertising Marketing Consulting to make the transition to mobile-friendly advertising easier.

Marketing is like flying, the more you stay current, better off you are.